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Old World vs. New World Wines

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Tonight, we’re having a Wine Dinner at Prime featuring wines from around the globe, rather than a specific producer. Therefore, I feel it’s appropriate to explore and explain the topic of the Dinner: “Old World vs. New World” as it pertains to wine.  In the world of wine, two terms often come up: "old world" and "new world." But what do they mean, and how do they affect the wine in your glass? Imagine the "old world" as a classic novel—full of tradition, history, and a deep connection to the land. Old world wines, predominantly from Europe, like France, Italy, and Spain, are often described as having lighter bodies, higher acidity, and more subtle fruit flavors with earthy undertones. These wines reflect centuries-old winemaking traditions and the concept of "terroir," which refers to the unique characteristics the soil, climate, and geography impart on the grapes.   On the other hand, "new world" wines are like a modern-day blockbuster

Stir or Shake?

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We all like to watch Matt, Prime’s Bartender do his “shaker thing” with our Award-Winning cocktails. But did you know there are a few guidelines as to when and why some  of your favorite drinks are either shaken or stirred. This edition of Felix’s facts spells it all out for you! Some people shake when they should stir, or stir when their cocktail needs to be shaken. The difference changes the entire texture and mouthfeel of the drink.   The general rule is that if there's something other than alcohol in the drink, you shake it. When to shake: Shake cocktails containing citrus or other juices, as well as those with cream, eggs, or dairy (our Drink your Desserts are an exception, as well as the ever popular Espresso Martinis to “the stir dairy” rule) How to shake: Forget about fancy techniques. A basic, straightforward shake is all you need to chill, aerate, and dilute a drink. One sign of a well-shaken cocktail is a frothy edge in cream or egg-based drinks, or a fine blanket of ice

Pairing Wine and Food Tips

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  A majority of the questions I receive from guests are about pairing wine with Prime’s Menu items. It’s very rewarding when our guests’ experience is elevated because the wine we decided to accompany their dish pairs together extremely well.   Here are some tips to help you pair wine with food, no matter where or what food you decide to enjoy: Acidic Match : Pick a wine with higher acidity than your food. It helps cleanse your palate between bites. Sweet Match : Sweeter wines go well with desserts or spicy dishes, providing a balancing contrast. Intensity Blend : Match the intensity of your wine with your food. Light wines for delicate flavors, bold wines for richer dishes. Red Meat, Red Wine : Red wines complement the richness of red meats, enhancing their flavors. White for Light : White wines pair beautifully with lighter meats like fish and chicken, letting the food's flavors shine. Bitter Balance : Bitter wines, like many reds, balance well with fatty foods, cutting through t

Port Wines: A Series Part 1

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As you all know, Prime Steakhouse prides itself in exposing our guests to as many beverage options as possible. Whether it’s our Aperitifs, Amari, or our Award-Winning Wines List, we are passionate about providing both the opportunity and education our guests deserve to enhance their dining experience. Port Wine deserves to be celebrated. Here is part one of a series of essays I’ve written to pique your interest in this most unique and intriguing beverage! Enjoy, and next time you visit Prime, please feel free to discuss Port with me! Cheers,  Felix Albano PRIME at Sky Meadow General Manager  Port is one of the most overlooked and underrated styles of wine on the market. When produced by great houses, these wines can provide some of the most delicious drinking experiences possible.  Whether paired with dessert, mixed into a cocktail or sipped neat after dinner, the versatility of  port wines  knows no limits, though understanding what the fortified wine is all about is key. Port was cr

Unlocking Flavor: The Art of Wine Decanting

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  Decanting wine can significantly improve its taste, but not all wines require this treatment. Young red wines often benefit from decanting to enhance aeration and remove sediment, while older wines may only need a brief exposure to air. Aeration can also be achieved by swirling the wine in the glass. The time a wine needs to breathe depends on its type and age. For example, a young, tannic red wine might require an hour or more in a decanter to soften its tannins, while a fresh Sauvignon Blanc could lose its character if left to breathe for too long. When deciding how long to let a wine breathe, consider pouring a small sample to test its aroma and taste. Young, tannic red wines generally benefit from more aeration, while older wines may need less. White and sparkling wines typically need less aeration, but if they have reductive notes, a brief exposure to air can improve their flavor. Ultimately, the best part of wine tasting is experiencing how a wine evolves after opening. Enjoyin

Champagne vs. Prosecco: A Resfresher

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  Let’s compare   Champagne   and   Prosecco . They’re both justifiably crushable and equally worthy of being opened to cheer a milestone, anniversary, or celebrate a promotion at work. Aside from the fact that both are filled with nose-tickling bubbles, Champagne and Prosecco are very different. Champagne is French, Prosecco is Italian, and both are places. Champagne is NOT a grape, it’s a place that makes sparkling wine called Champagne. Same thing goes for Prosecco: NOT a grape, it’s a place. •The Champagne region in northern France. The   Veneto   and Friuli regions in northern Italy. •Both are   famously quite steep with hilly terrain .   •Both regions are rainy and cool.   Champagne Grapes vs. Prosecco Grapes •Champagne’s identity is shaped by a famous trio of grapes:   Chardonnay ,   Pinot Noir , and Pinot Meunier.   •Prosecco is characterized by one grape, a highly aromatic white variety called Glera. Method Champenoise and Charmat Method •Champagne is made using   m├ęthode Cham

How Is Bourbon Different From Whiskey?

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  Whiskey is made all across the world, and across America, too, but here’s the headline when it comes to bourbon:   Bourbon is a type of American whiskey, made with at least 51% corn. Remember that, and everything else falls into place. *Bourbon drinkers are fond of saying, All bourbon is whiskey, but not all whiskey is bourbon. *Bourbon is America’s take on whiskey that came over with the original colonists and immigrants from Europe. *People arriving in America brought their distilling traditions with them and adapted them to the grains and materials at hand to create a new kind of whiskey. Corn thrived in the U.S. more than rye and barley, so the colonists and early immigrants pivoted toward it as a base for their whiskies. *Whiskey is a broader category, and the grains will vary depending on the type of whiskey. For example,   Scotch whiskey is made from malted (germinated) barley, while American rye whiskey contains at least 51% rye grain. (Rye made elsewhere may vary, but should